And So It Goes

Last night, in anticipation of a warm day today, we opened up the house before we went to bed to allow the cool air in while we slept. Upon arising this morning, we were making the rounds to get all the windows closed up and just as we entered the kitchen, which is in the corner of the house nearest the chicken coop, we were surprised by the sound of a rooster crowing. Stepping quickly out of the house, I caught sight of the chicken we have known and loved as Lollie standing proudly on a log in the coop opening up to another full-throated “Cock-a-doodle-do” and revealing himself to be Lalo. And just like that, the story of raising 5 hens changed.

We like to think we’re the author of our own stories, and for the most part, I am privileged to be able to believe that I am, that I have control over how the story goes. I was deliberate in the breeds I chose, I purchased the chicks from a reputable breeder, I made considered decisions as to how to feed and care for my new charges, and further carefully planned how best to house them over the long term. I was writing this story of our sweet little flock of hens — or so it seemed.

Sometimes, a story writes itself. Lollie was so much bigger than the others (we had affectionately dubbed ‘her’ The Beast); while the others are happy to be stroked and held, Lollie always shied away from any contact initiated by us but instead would peck (hard) at our clothing and skin (as if to intimidate); and in the past week it had become harder to ignore the beautiful plumage that was looking more and more like a rooster. Try as they do to correctly determine the sex of chicks before shipping them off, the breeders acknowledge there will be mistakes: Lollie’s story was always different than the story that I had imagined (and kept trying to believe) — in fact it is Lalo’s story and it is not mine to tell. Within an hour of this morning’s revelation, I delivered Lalo to a local farm center so that a new home for him can be found.

Recently we visited a brewpub where our waitress was generously tattooed. In particular, I noticed two tats in elaborate script that were symmetrically arranged and I asked her about them. One suggested, “Everything is a story.” The other claimed, “Stories are everything.” As we sit with our sadness today after losing our Lollie, the stories ARE everything and we are grateful that, for a time, our stories were intertwined. Truly we are only authors of our own responses to whatever comes next, whether it be anticipated delight or unexpected bummer, THAT is what we can control as the stories unfold. ‘Flock of five hens’ becomes ‘flock of four hens and one rooster’ becomes ‘flock of four hens’ — the story changes and we move through our disappointment to embrace the new normal with grace because we can. And so it goes.

The Birds and the Bees

Lately the population at Acorn Lodge has swelled in number by an additional 30,005, or so — not by any accident of ‘the birds and the bees,’ but rather because we’re finally acting on our plans to keep chickens and honeybees here. Over the last year or two we’ve done the reading and obtained (and built) the requisite equipment: the proper tools will support our endeavors best, and our setting, home to all manner of predators who would relish a chicken dinner, added another layer of consideration to our preparations on that front. And then, a few months back, we eagerly placed our orders to reserve the breeds our research suggested would be the best fit for us (we wanted local bees; hens that are docile, and lay a mixture of egg colors, among other features). Careful ‘family planning’ is a cornerstone of well-managed domestic bliss, yes? Finally, with April and May cleared on the calendar so that we could be dedicated ‘Mama’ and ‘Papa’ for the newly adopted, we felt ready!

Well, the chicks arrived, more or less according to plan, via the US Mail. Shipped on a Monday for overnight delivery, I didn’t actually get the call to collect the peeping box until 6:38 a.m. Wednesday morning, but once the hatchlings were nestled into their brooder box, encouraged to drink water, and had discovered their feed they were happy to settle in and are growing so quickly I feel I can almost see it happening. We have five different breeds: a Dominique (Dolly), a Silver-Laced Wyandotte (Dottie), a Buff Orpington (Biddy), a Welsummer (Sadie), and an Easter Egger (Lollie). They are darling to watch and interact with (they will eat from my hand now, and Lollie will hop onto my outstretched palm to do so!) but the real story here is the chronicle of the bees’ arrivals.

The rocky knoll that sits on one side of our driveway appears to be a sweet spot for swarms — this is the third spring in a row that we’ve been graced by said. An enormous swarm, the size of two footballs, gathered on April 1 in the easy-to-reach-into young hawthorn tree that I planted on the knoll last spring, and with the help of some local beekeepers the swarm was easily contained in a temporary box. Thrilled to have secured local, feral bees for my hive, I called to cancel the package of bees I had ordered for pick-up later in the month. Early the next morning I transferred the swarm to the hive I had ready for them, and for seven sweet hours the colony appeared to be setting up housekeeping in their new quarters. But alas, they swarmed again (absconded) — leaving me as forlorn as a spurned lover, the joy of the previous day dashed to pieces by their abandonment of the hive. The following day, I reinstated my bee package order.

Several days later I spotted another swarm in the same area, but this swarm (the same bees?) was 30′ up in the towering fir trees, too difficult to try to capture. Then on April 13th, a third swarm gathered, this time back in the hawthorn tree. This swarm was more an average size and I decided to capture it myself, transferring the bees directly into my hive from the tree. I did not cancel my bee package order this time around — once burned, twice shy — but instead ordered another hive set-up in case I needed it. Two weeks on, the feral colony looks to be staying put and I’ve since picked up my package of bees, so I’ve now got two hives going: the bees have arrived, and how!

We didn’t plan to start beekeeping with two hives, but neither did we plan to start our lives as parents with two children — and we did. Our first pregnancy, many years ago, was greeted with the same kind of joy I felt on capturing that first swarm of bees: we were ready to have children, and rushed right out to buy a crib, thrilled to anticipate the baby’s arrival. But that first combination of our DNA was not a successful one, the miscarriage being just as devastating as having that swarm abscond. That baby was not meant to be, any more than that first swarm was meant to be ours. Then life unfolds, nature takes her course, bringing us first our twin sons and then our daughter, and honestly, I can’t imagine — wouldn’t want — any children other than those that are ours. I have no regrets for what might have been, only gratitude for what IS.

Here and now, with the tenure of the birds and the bees established at Acorn Lodge, the stewardship of coop and hives is my welcome responsibility, my opportunity to extend myself in the care and feeding of others, my privilege to observe and appreciate.

Make the most of what comes and the least of what goes.

The chicks enjoying their favorite treat of fresh chopped herbs from the garden

The Care and Feeding of Others

Today I pulled the final bit of pumpkin from last summer’s garden out of the freezer in order to bake up a batch of biscuits for our dogs, one of a couple of tasks I have set for myself this afternoon. I’ll also spend some time in the garden (starting the seeds for this year’s pumpkins in fact!) and continue with some reading on the subjects of chickens and bees (more on that soon). I can’t claim to be accomplishing anything of great importance these days as I putter about, but I am nonetheless deeply satisfied by day’s end — and that, I’ve decided, is accomplishment enough.

The thread that seems to run through my activities on a given day seems to be tied to my urge to nurture: the organizing principle behind my efforts is the value I place on the care and feeding of others. I feel it as a driving force, and one that I’ve recently come to acknowledge as THE motivation for rousting myself from my cosy bed each morning. By extension then, almost paradoxically, the care and feeding of others is, for me, a completely selfish act (perhaps my mother was right after all!): acting on my desire to nurture others is the very best way I have to nurture myself.

I’m happy to bake biscuits from scratch for the dogs, willing to spend the time it takes to water the garden by hand, delighted to tidy up and refresh the cottage ahead of the arrival of guests. I actually don’t mind even the routine maintenance tasks of house and garden — planning and executing meals, weeding and pruning, neatening and cleaning inside and out to ensure an easy comfort. Each of these activities affords me the blissful solitude I crave as a confirmed introvert and ensures the payoff of eventual company (which even an introvert needs from time to time!). Pets and garden, friends and family actually do me a favor by asking of my time and energy because there is no other way I’d rather be spending my days: the care and feeding of others is my true religion.

My darling daughter found this recipe online and I have no idea whom to credit — but our dogs will do anything for these biscuits!

Dog Biscuits
⅔ cup pumpkin purée, canned or fresh
2 large eggs
3 tbs. peanut butter (I use one with no added salt or sugar)
2½ cups whole wheat flour
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Place all ingredients in the mixing bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on medium for about a minute to obtain a stiff dough. Gather up half of the dough and roll out to ¼” thickness. You can either use a cookie cutter to cut out shapes or use a knife to cut squares or strips. Repeat with the other half of the dough, then gather the scraps together and reroll to cut more until all the dough is used. Place the biscuits on a baking sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes until browned and crisp. Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container.

“There are random moments — tossing a salad, coming up the driveway to the house, ironing the seams flat on a quilt square, standing at the kitchen window and looking out at the delphiniums, hearing a burst of laughter from one of my children’s rooms — when I feel a wavelike rush of joy. This is my true religion: arbitrary moments of nearly painful happiness for a life I feel privileged to lead. Think of the way you sometimes see a tiny shaft of sunlight burst through a gap between rocks, the way it then expands to illuminate a much large space — it’s like that. And it’s like quilting, a thread surfacing and then disappearing into the fabric of ordinary days. It’s not always visible, but it’s what holds everything together.”

— Elizabeth Berg

Cosy in the Woods

Cozy in the Woods

When our (twin) sons were very small, one of the stories they loved hearing was contained in a chunky little book called Cozy in the Woods. The would ask for it often as they began to speak (“Cosies . . . woods!”), and given that it is illustrated by one of my favorite artists, I was more than happy to read this endearing story to them again and again. Now, as we continue to settle in at Acorn Lodge, I find I hear the echo of their small, sweet voices in my head regularly (“Cosies . . . woods!”), and especially as we finally begin to unpack our books, we are indeed feeling cosy in the woods!

We own thousands of books, and many of them have been squirreled away in long-term storage for more than two years now, since we could not accommodate them all in our San Francisco home. The bookcases that line the two long walls in the Great Room here have, at long last, been built into place over the last few weeks, and so we have begun the task of lugging box after box of books into the house and unpacking. Some of the books are as yet unread, treats (one hopes!) for future dates, but we are delighted to commune with the others once again as old friends.

We have been fortunate to have our fair share of visitors at Acorn Lodge since we moved in a few months ago. There is joy in the warmth of friendship, in the exchange of stories, in sharing this space with them — an undisputed cosiness generated by their company for which we are grateful. We find many of the same charms in our books: because of the possibility they represent to explore the unknown, to suggest new ideas, and to offer fresh ways of looking at the world, books are friends to our need to create meaning. We were determined from the outset to provide adequate space for our books in our new home. For us, there is no ‘home’ without books, and we are gratified to cosy up Acorn Lodge with their treasured presence.

The first volumes that were unpacked comprise our collection of children’s literature, one that is not inconsiderable. I believe that the most important means of nurturing children (aside, of course, from providing for health and safety) is simply to read to them. Many years ago, I was asked by the Director at our children’s nursery school to share my love and knowledge of children’s books with the other parents at school, so I created an annotated list of the books which were our children’s favorites. The list was added to in the years that followed, after I had joined the staff at the nursery school, and I offer it up here in case anyone is looking for a good book with which to cosy up to the child(ren) in his or her life.

Kelly’s Picks (PDF)

With our library at the ready, full of volumes to suit everyone from the youngest to the most ‘mature’ among us, we feel truly blessed and unequivocally at home. The leaves are falling now from the trees outside the Great Room windows, but with books to hand and a fire to sit beside, how could we be anything but cosy in the woods?!?

“A room without books is like a body without a soul.”

— Cicero

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The Fruits of Our Labors

The orchard, newly planted

Our small orchard was planted out on July 4th, the first opportunity we had to transfer the 12 bare-root whips I had received back in January from their temporary pots to permanent ground. It took so much longer than I had anticipated to ready that permanent spot: building a retaining wall along the driveway in order to provide a level grade, getting the fence up to protect the young trees from the deer, and erecting our garden shed in the adjacent space. Finally, armed with pick-axe and shovel, we broke ground, amended soil, and wrestled the trees from their pots though the day was a hot one – we just didn’t want to wait any longer to establish our orchard.

When I say ‘small orchard’ I mean that literally. It’s not just that we have a small number of trees, but rather that I have pruned them according to the advice from a book called Grow a Little Fruit Tree, which will yield . . . well, small trees. The idea is to nurture trees whose mature canopies top out at about 6 feet, meaning the fruit is easy to harvest; crops are reasonably sized; and the trees may be planted relatively closer together.

We have planted two plums (Early Laxton and Blue Damson), two apricots (Blenheim and Moorpark), two pears (Comice and Seckel), four apples (Ashmead’s Kernel, Yellow Bellflower, Grimes Golden, and Cox’s Orange Pippin), a Van Deman quince, and a Black Mission fig – all this in a space that measures just over 100 feet square.

Of course, it will be two or three years before we harvest any fruit. Cultivating an orchard is an exercise in delayed gratification, to be sure. But we have the thrill of anticipating the literal fruit of our labor someday and the satisfaction of reaping the metaphorical fruit already: I am utterly delighted to gaze out upon the orchard from the nook in the kitchen, appreciating that it stands both as a promise for the future and in tribute to our labor of love in fulfilling the vision we have for Acorn Lodge.

Meanwhile, much of our recent labor has yielded tangible results more quickly: the lavender we planted at the edge of the orchard is in bloom, and the basil that we’ve been carefully tending nearby has already been put to use in several batches of pesto for the freezer in addition to lending flavor and visual appeal to homemade lemonade.

Lemonade with Lavender and Basil
¾ cup sugar
¾ cup water
3 tbs. dried lavender blossoms
1½ cups freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 fresh basil sprigs
3 cups water
Combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan. Set over a medium heat and simmer, without stirring, until the sugar is fully dissolved and the resulting syrup is clear. Remove from the heat and stir in the lavender blossoms. Leave to steep for at least 30 minutes and as long as an hour. Strain the syrup into a pitcher, then add the lemon juice, basil sprigs, and water. Stir and chill thoroughly before serving.

 

For me, the surest contentment comes of having done the work myself, whether stirring up a pitcher of lemonade from scratch or planting out an orchard on a previously bare patch of ground. I like feeling at the end of the day that I’ve been productive – that is the sweetest fruit of all.

Lavender in the orchard

“The reward of a thing well done, is to have done it.”

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

Home at Last

Cinnamon-Sugar Breakfast Puffs

Given the symmetry of the façade of Acorn Lodge, it seems utterly appropriate that we were finally granted our Occupancy Permit on June 1st . . . 6/1/16. There remains much work to be done so the days are busy still, with the sounds of table saws and nail guns providing a somewhat jarring but ultimately reassuring soundtrack. Dust is my constant companion, my vacuum cleaner my new best friend. Nonetheless, as we begin slowly to unpack and settle in there is no doubt that we are HOME.

It has been delightful to become reacquainted with treasures that have been packed away these last two years. I feel a bit like a child at Christmas as I unwrap dishes and other delicate objects: the paper falls away to reveal cherished items that feel doubly dear to me as I appreciate them anew. Further, after spending two years in storage following repair and refinishing, my piano has come HOME – and though it will take some time and dedicated effort to regain what proficiency I had, I can hardly wait to begin tickling the ivories again.

The Cottage was finished just days before the piano was delivered to take up residency there, and shortly thereafter, the Cottage stood ready to welcome guests, standing in as HOME-away-from-home for Acorn Lodge’s first visitors. It’s a cosy and, we hope, comfortable spot, and as I prepared for our friends’ stay, I discovered a cosy and delicious recipe that will become a signature breakfast treat at Acorn Lodge. We love our friends, and I love my new kitchen, and we all loved these little muffins – and you know what they say about HOME . . .

Cinnamon-Sugar Breakfast Puffs
2 cups flour
1½ cups sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1 generous tsp. cinnamon
1 scant tsp. freshly ground nutmeg
Pinch cardamom
½ tsp. fine-grain sea salt
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 cup whole milk
3 tbs. unsalted butter, melted
2 tsp. vanilla
½ cup sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
Generous pinch fine-grain sea salt
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease a mini-muffin pan.
Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, and salt into a large bowl. In a second bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, butter, and vanilla. Add the wet mixture to the dry mixture and stir a little at a time until combined.
Spoon the batter into the tin and bake for 16-18 minutes. (Or cover and refrigerate batter for later use.) Meanwhile, combine the remaining sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a shallow bowl.
When puffs are cooked, remove from the tin after 2-3 minutes and place on a cooling rack. Let cool for a minute then coat them in cinnamon-sugar mixture. Place back on rack to cool further. Serve warm or cold.

 

Home is where the heart is.

-Pliny the Elder

Grace

Crane Acorn 'Tile"

I used to work on costuming for the theater department at our local high school. The program is a well-respected one that consistently produces high caliber productions, and designing and producing the costumes was a delightful creative outlet for me for a time. As satisfying as the endeavor was, the biggest take-away for me from the experience had nothing to do with the costumes and everything to do with the comportment of our fearless leader, department head Kathleen Woods. I marveled at how, even as we entered into the inevitable days-before-opening, show-must-go-on craze, she maintained a serene presence, always calm and radiating assurance: none of the fabled tantrums that creative types are prone to having, never even a cross or unkind word — just the picture of grace under pressure.

I asked Kathleen once about her apparently endless reserves of patience with the antics of her youthful charges, her calm determination to meet obstacles with both a smile and a willingness to move on — her seemingly unflappable mien. I don’t remember the exact words of her answer to my query, but I do remember that she indicated that she makes a deliberate choice to be graceful in her response to stress. She chooses an attitude of positivity and productivity in order that the process will continue to move forward in the most pleasant and satisfying way for all involved.

My friend Carrie is ‘famous’ for telling her son when he hits a bump in the road, “You can have a fit or make a plan.” She is of course, advocating for the latter, but the truth of the matter is we always have a choice: we can look for someone to blame, complain of ill-treatment, wallow in our misery – or we can accept that ‘it is what it is’ and move on. Fussing and fuming rarely change the outcome for the better, and in fact can cause more damage to a situation in the long run; a little faith that all will come right in the end if we can remain positive quite likely serves us better. But the choice remains: tantrum or calm smile.

We are nearing the ‘Curtain up’ phase of the project (a hopeful move-in date is nigh) and the pressure is on to bring the production up to snuff (conditions set by the Building Department must be met before we may occupy the house). The work has been outlined appropriately, subs set into the schedule, inspections added to the calendar – and then the mason’s grandfather passes away, the electrician’s van breaks down, the finish carpenter is ill with food poisoning, and all the good intentions in the world won’t provide shelter for us once our tenancy in our temporary digs is up at the end of the month. Perhaps only the ghost light will shine in the theater on what was to have been Opening Night . . .

Our landlord’s emails are tagged with the following quote:

“Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass,
it’s about learning to dance in the rain.”

 At this point, I’m dancing as fast as I’m able, and I can only hope it may be noted when all is said and done that by and large my ‘moves’ were graceful!

 

“In the end, only three things matter: how much you loved, how gently you lived, and how gracefully you let go of the things not meant for you.”

— Buddha

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Getting There

Sonoma landscape

The end of construction looms so close I can almost taste it: flooring is going in, cabinetry is being installed, and the trimming of doors and windows has begun. Outside, most of the siding is in place, masonry is proceeding nicely, and the final roof tile will be nailed down this week. Slowly but surely, we are getting there!

Meanwhile, we have moved from our transitional digs in San Francisco (such lovely digs they were!) to a temporary furnished rental . . . in Sonoma. We’re finally residents of Sonoma County, two years after buying our property. The fact of our arrival here is doubly sweet because it means my commute to the property is 30 minutes instead of the hour and a quarter the drive from the City took: getting there is now so much easier.

It’s not that I minded the drive – I’m generally happy to be with my own thoughts, and the opportunity the drive afforded to ruminate on the project did not go amiss. Besides, Highway 12 is literally signposted as a Scenic Route (and thankfully, that’s the stretch of the route that constitutes my current commute). The bucolic character of the Sonoma Valley continues to delight me almost beyond measure, and the delight that I experience is a good reminder of the need to appreciate the journey even as we endeavor to reach our destination: after all, getting there is (often more than) half the fun.

In fact, I am so enjoying the journey that I’m a bit apprehensive about nearing the end – but only a bit. I remind myself that I’ll have ahead of me the challenge of setting up the beehive and figuring out how best to nurture the chickens, the opportunity to create and sustain a new garden, and the delight of turning my creative energy toward feathering our new nest with curtains and cushions and the like. The building will be finished, but maybe like a good garden, a good home is never really ‘done’ . . . maybe we’ll never actually get there after all, but oh, what a pleasant jaunt it may be when we strive toward that for which we long!

“If I were asked to say what is at once the most important production of Art
and the thing most to be longed for, I should answer,
‘A beautiful House.'”

— William Morris

Rock On!

Rocks on the property

I feel lately like my head is full of rocks — but it’s not all bad! Certainly there was the rocky road of the black paint brouhaha that we had to navigate: I found myself so distracted trying to stay upright during that bumpy and bruising journey that the every-day just fell away, and simple tasks like putting out the cans for recycling and trash collection fell off my radar completely. Whoops! We’re glad to put those metaphorical rocks in the rear-view mirror and look forward to a smoother ride as we accelerate back up to cruising speed on the project. Besides, we have other, actual rocks that happily command our attention at the moment.

The foundations for Acorn Lodge conform, of course, to current construction standards (i.e., they are poured concrete), but I love the idea of a home built on a stone foundation. Especially in a setting such as ours where the soil yielded a veritable trove of fine specimens when we graded and dug to put the foundations in place, it seems a shame not to incorporate them into the design. So the mason has his work cut out for him: he is charged with creating the illusion that the Lodge and Cottage sit on stone foundations. We can’t make use solely of the rock we’ve recovered from the property because much of it is over-sized, so I’m on the hunt for suitable stone to add to the mix, bearing in mind the importance of maintaining the integrity of the project. Just because it is an illusion doesn’t mean it should reveal itself as such by a failure on my part to pay attention to what is suggested by our setting: I want for the finished product to feel as though it mushroomed up out of the ground organically and for it to look perfectly at home in its surroundings, a natural fit for the sylvan charm that surrounds us. I am, therefore, determined to wear my rock hound hat until the ‘just-right’ rock is found and secured!

Meanwhile, perhaps the most exciting ‘rock’ of all has made its appearance at Acorn Lodge: the sheet-rocking has begun, and I say, “Rock on!” I was particularly pleased to walk into the kitchen the other day and find the breakfast nook looking ready to receive its panelling and trim. This is the space we will inhabit as we welcome each day, with sun from the east spilling through the windows; as well, here is where the two of us will enjoy cosy kitchen suppers when we want to give the dining room a rest. Cooking and eating are central to my notion of well-being, so besides having a functional and attractive kitchen to work in, I need a beautiful and welcoming place to sit to enjoy both the fruits of my labor and the company of those for whom I cook. As imagined, the nook will fit the bill perfectly, and in fact now that the sheet-rock is in place (‘on’), I can empty my head of each of the rooms as conceived, and begin to enjoy them as they are: rock-solid interpretations of all that I yearn for when I conjure my notion of home. No more plotting and planning — just appreciation for what is!

Breakfast Nook

“Write your worries in the sand,
Carve your blessings in stone.”

— Robert F. Kennedy

Good to Go

Acorns

After a week’s worth of Sturm und Drang, we got the happy news this morning that we may begin painting again – our choice of black for the trim has been approved by the Architectural Committee — so we find ourselves relieved to feel we’re no longer going to the dogs but rather good to go! Truthfully, it will take some time to put this whole unhappy episode fully behind us, but we mean to take heart from the notion that “You can’t keep a good man/woman (project!) down.”

Initially rejected by the Architectural Committee, the black paint was decreed to be too bold (“shocking,” in fact), too much in contrast with the natural environment that enfolds the community. I will readily admit that at the moment, because the house is sheathed in white Tyvek, the black does appear rather stark at first glance. But the picture won’t be complete until the siding is put in place [the dogs were barking up the wrong tree]: the relative value of the black will be aptly matched by the brown of the cedar shingles, bringing the house as a whole into harmonious balance. Moreover, there actually IS no contrast in black with the environment except of one that has the effect of enhancement:

Black is a good foil for green.
In a garden or against natural surroundings, black will recede
and focus attention instead on green foliage.
Gardenista.com

Thankfully, with a concerted effort on my part, I was able to convince the Architectural Committee that my choice of black for the trim was based on qualifications of good design and was meant to contribute to the greater good of the community, in keeping with the committee’s guidelines and standards. We’re another step closer to making ourselves at home in Acorn Lodge, our little brown nut sitting prettily among the oaks.

I’ve long taken the following as my own personal set of guidelines and standards:

To laugh often and love much;
to win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection of children;
to earn the approbation of honest citizens and endure the betrayal of false friends;
to appreciate beauty;
to find the best in others;
to give of one’s self;
to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition;
to have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung with exultation;
to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived . . .
this is to have succeeded.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

And so the transgressions of misguided neighbors will be forgiven, hope is restored in my heart, and I find myself grateful for the opportunity to rededicate myself to my ideals — it occurs to me that we are not merely building a home, but continuing to build character in ourselves in the bargain!

 

Emerson quote